Why Are Nurses So Mean? (11 Reasons Why)

Photo of author
Oberon Copeland

Oberon Copeland is a graduate of Southern Illinois University Carbondale, with a degree in economics and HR.

Nurses have some of the most demanding jobs in the medical field. They are tasked with caring for patients around the clock, often with little rest or support. This can lead to nurses feeling overworked, stressed out, and underappreciated.

It’s no wonder that nurses can sometimes seem mean or angry. Several factors can contribute to a nurse’s bad mood, and here are 11 reasons why nurses might seem mean.

Why Are Nurses So Mean?


1. They’re Overworked

Nurses are often tasked with more patients than they can realistically handle. This can lead to them feeling overworked and stressed out.

A typical day in the life of a nurse can be long and grueling, and they may have to work 12-hour shifts with few breaks in between, which can leave them feeling mentally and physically exhausted.

From the moment they start their shift, nurses are constantly on the go. They may have to deal with hostile patients, complicated families, and life-threatening emergencies.

It’s no wonder that nurses can sometimes seem mean or angry. They’re simply trying to cope with the enormous stress they face daily.

2. They’re Underpaid

Nurses are some of the lowest-paid medical workers, which can lead to them feeling underappreciated and disgruntled.

Nurses typically start out making around $35 per hour. However, experienced nurses can earn up to $65 per hour. But even this is far less than what doctors and other healthcare professionals make.

It’s no wonder that nurses might seem resentful when they see how much more money other people in the medical field are making.

Moreover, nurses typically deal with far more demanding workloads than other medical professionals and are often expected to work long hours with little rest or support.

Such a demanding schedule and work environment can promptly lead to stress for nurses trying to provide sufficient care to their patients.

3. Daily Suffering

Nurses see patients suffering daily, which can take an emotional toll on them over time.

Read More:  Why Do We Have To Work? (11 Reasons Why)

Nurses often form strong bonds with their patients. They may feel like they’re the only ones who truly understand what they’re going through.

It’s not uncommon for nurses to suffer from compassion fatigue, a condition characterized by emotional exhaustion, cynicism, and a sense of detachment.

Compassion fatigue can lead to nurses feeling burnt out and resentful. They may have trouble empathizing with patients and may seem mean or uncaring.

4. Death & Grief

Nurses also see people regularly die, making them feel grief-stricken and overwhelmed.

Dealing with death is one of the most challenging aspects of being a nurse. They may feel they failed their patients if they couldn’t save them.

Nurses often have to deal with the grieving families of their patients as well. This can be an incredibly emotionally draining experience.

It’s not uncommon for nurses to become desensitized to death over time, making them seem insensitive and uncaring.

5. Difficult Patients

Nurses also have to deal with complex patients regularly. This can include everything from rude comments to physical assaults.

It’s not uncommon for patients to take out their frustrations on nurses, and they may be angry, scared, or simply feeling helpless.

This can lead to nurses feeling resentful and frustrated. They may start to see all patients as potential threats.

6. Difficult Families

Difficult Families

Nurses also have to deal with complicated families regularly. This can include anything from emotional outbursts to physical violence.

Families of critically ill patients can be incredibly stressful for nurses, and these families may be desperate, scared, and angry. Some families feel this way when their loved one is sick and in the hospital.

Unfortunately, this can make nurses feel like they’re constantly walking on eggshells. They may start to view all families as potential threats, which is why some nurses appear mean and uncaring.

Read More:  Why Are Cops Called 5-0? (7 Reasons Why)

7. Harassment

Nurses are also at risk of being harassed by patients, families, and co-workers. This can include everything from sexual harassment to racial discrimination.

Nurses may feel like they’re in a constant state of battle, trying to defend themselves against those who would do them harm.

It’s a sad state of affairs, but it comes with being a nurse. It takes a particular person to deal with all the potential threats they face daily.

But at the same time, it’s easy to see why nurses aren’t always sunshine and rainbows. They deal with a lot of difficult and dangerous situations regularly.

So the next time you see a nurse who seems mean, remember that they’re probably just trying to survive the day.

8. Lack of Support

Nurses also often feel like they lack the support they need to do their jobs effectively, and this can be from hospital staff, families, or even patients.
Nurses may feel called on constantly and that no one understands what they’re going through.

This can lead to nurses feeling isolated and alone. They may feel like they’re the only ones caring about their patients.

An environment like this isn’t good in a medical facility, and it’s almost sure to cause nurses a great deal of stress.

9. Burnout

Nurses are also at risk of burnout from their job’s demanding nature, which can make them feel exhausted, cynical, and detached from their work.

Burnout can cause nurses to make mistakes, become apathetic, and even quit their jobs. It’s a severe problem that can majorly impact a nurse’s career.

Hospitals could combat this problem by providing more support to nurses, but it’s often left up to the nurses themselves to deal with it.

This results in many nurses struggling to keep up with the demands of their job, leading to even more stress.

Read More:  Why Are Hairdressers So Rude? (11 Reasons Why) 

10. Poor Working Conditions

Nurses also have to deal with poor working conditions regularly. This can include everything from understaffing to dangerous environments.

Understaffing is a significant problem in many hospitals. This can lead to nurses feeling overworked and underappreciated.

They may feel forced to do more with less, leading to significant stress and frustration.

Dangerous working conditions are also a significant concern for nurses. They may have to deal with exposure to infectious diseases, hazardous materials, and violence.

This can lead to nurses feeling like they’re constantly in danger. They may feel like their job is more of a liability than an asset.

Nurses might start to think they’re being taken advantage of, which can quickly lead to disdain for their jobs.

11. Lack Of Home Life

Nurses also often have to deal with the fact that their job can take a toll on their home life. This can include everything from missed family events to financial stress.

Nurses may feel like they’re always on call and that their job is never done. This can lead to a great deal of stress and anxiety.

It can also make nurses feel like they’re sacrificing their personal life for their job. This can be a difficult balance to maintain.

To learn more, you can also read our posts on why nurses think they are so great, why presidents do not wear wedding rings, and why mail carriers make so much.

Conclusion

Nurses deal with a lot of stress daily, which can make them feel mean, exhausted, and burned out. It’s important to remember that nurses are just trying their best in challenging and dangerous jobs.

If you know a nurse, try to be understanding and supportive. They need all the help they can get.

Author

Leave a Comment